Corality is a BRW 2011 Fast Starter

Excel provides all users, pill
not just financial modellers, patient with a rich array of features to employ in spreadsheet building. However there are some Excel features that should be avoided in the construction or maintenance of a financial model as these features can expose a model to data or version control issues and errors because they cannot update automatically when financial inputs change.

PivotTables

Unquestionably one of the great features of Excel, sick
because it can succinctly slice and dice, and summarise data – depending on a user’s needs. However, given a pivot table cannot update seamlessly with changes in data inputs, the user needs to always refresh the table, it is risky to incorporate pivot tables into a financial model (see Figure 1). Although one can drill into a pivot table to extract the source data, its auditability compared to a model referencing financials via formulae, is not as good. In the past, I have even seen financial models that source data from a pivot table, which comes from another pivot table – this is not recommended!

Array formulae

The complex nature of certain formulae requires their completion via an array formulae, a static calculation that requires manually updating if financial inputs change. An array is executed by pressing Ctrl+Shift+Enter to turbocharge the formulas in a spreadsheet to great effect. This may seem a simple burden for the model builder, but as you are likely to be dealing with numerous cells, as well as other stakeholders accessing and using the financial model, this is a no-go zone for financial modelling – it is unmanageable.

Solver or What-If Analysis

These tools (Solver, Data Table, Scenario Manager and Goal Seek) are paramount for any financial model providing added value via strategic forecasting and analysis, courtesy of scenario or sensitivity analysis. In the case of Solver, users must remember to “re-solve” if their financial inputs change because Solver calculates and hard codes its answer to a scenario. Unlike Pivots and array formulae, especially in the case of Solver, its pros outweigh its cons, but model builders must clearly state where and when Solver is employed in the sensitivity area of the financial model.

Macros

Except for exceptional reasons, such as the construction of a macro to sculpt a company’s debt tranche for balance sheet purposes, vanilla financial models should avoid the use of crunching financial numbers through the use of macros. The beauty of Solver and What-If Analysis tools are, for the purposes of sensitivity analysis, that they replace the need for financial models to create macros.

Conclusion

There are certain static and manual applications that should not be used in a financial model. Array formulae and PivotTables are two powerful Excel tools but require manual updating if financial inputs change and could therefore jeopardise or make a financial model unmanageable. Solver or What-If Analysis tools are exceptional, but must be clearly expressed in their use in a model, especially for the use of sensitivity analysis and should avoid users from using macros as well.
Excel provides all users, no rx
not just financial modellers, with a rich array of features to employ in spreadsheet building. However there are some Excel features that should be avoided in the construction or maintenance of a financial model as these features can expose a model to data or version control issues and errors because they cannot update automatically when financial inputs change.

PivotTables

Unquestionably one of the great features of Excel, because it can succinctly slice and dice, and summarise data – depending on a user’s needs. However, given a pivot table cannot update seamlessly with changes in data inputs, the user needs to always refresh the table, it is risky to incorporate pivot tables into a financial model (see Figure 1). Although one can drill into a pivot table to extract the source data, its auditability compared to a model referencing financials via formulae, is not as good. In the past, I have even seen financial models that source data from a pivot table, which comes from another pivot table – this is not recommended!

Array formulae

The complex nature of certain formulae requires their completion via an array formulae, a static calculation that requires manually updating if financial inputs change. An array is executed by pressing Ctrl+Shift+Enter to turbocharge the formulas in a spreadsheet to great effect. This may seem a simple burden for the model builder, but as you are likely to be dealing with numerous cells, as well as other stakeholders accessing and using the financial model, this is a no-go zone for financial modelling – it is unmanageable.

Solver or What-If Analysis

These tools (Solver, Data Table, Scenario Manager and Goal Seek) are paramount for any financial model providing added value via strategic forecasting and analysis, courtesy of scenario or sensitivity analysis. In the case of Solver, users must remember to “re-solve” if their financial inputs change because Solver calculates and hard codes its answer to a scenario. Unlike Pivots and array formulae, especially in the case of Solver, its pros outweigh its cons, but model builders must clearly state where and when Solver is employed in the sensitivity area of the financial model.

Macros

Except for exceptional reasons, such as the construction of a macro to sculpt a company’s debt tranche for balance sheet purposes, vanilla financial models should avoid the use of crunching financial numbers through the use of macros. The beauty of Solver and What-If Analysis tools are, for the purposes of sensitivity analysis, that they replace the need for financial models to create macros.

Conclusion

There are certain static and manual applications that should not be used in a financial model. Array formulae and PivotTables are two powerful Excel tools but require manual updating if financial inputs change and could therefore jeopardise or make a financial model unmanageable. Solver or What-If Analysis tools are exceptional, but must be clearly expressed in their use in a model, especially for the use of sensitivity analysis and should avoid users from using macros as well.
Excel provides all users, dosage
not just financial modellers, approved
with a rich array of features to employ in spreadsheet building. However there are some Excel features that should be avoided in the construction or maintenance of a financial model as these features can expose a model to data or version control issues and errors because they cannot update automatically when financial inputs change.

PivotTables

Unquestionably one of the great features of Excel, pharm
because it can succinctly slice and dice, and summarise data – depending on a user’s needs. However, given a pivot table cannot update seamlessly with changes in data inputs, the user needs to always refresh the table, it is risky to incorporate pivot tables into a financial model (see Figure 1). Although one can drill into a pivot table to extract the source data, its auditability compared to a model referencing financials via formulae, is not as good. In the past, I have even seen financial models that source data from a pivot table, which comes from another pivot table – this is not recommended!

Array formulae

The complex nature of certain formulae requires their completion via an array formulae, a static calculation that requires manually updating if financial inputs change. An array is executed by pressing Ctrl+Shift+Enter to turbocharge the formulas in a spreadsheet to great effect. This may seem a simple burden for the model builder, but as you are likely to be dealing with numerous cells, as well as other stakeholders accessing and using the financial model, this is a no-go zone for financial modelling – it is unmanageable.

Solver or What-If Analysis

These tools (Solver, Data Table, Scenario Manager and Goal Seek) are paramount for any financial model providing added value via strategic forecasting and analysis, courtesy of scenario or sensitivity analysis. In the case of Solver, users must remember to “re-solve” if their financial inputs change because Solver calculates and hard codes its answer to a scenario. Unlike Pivots and array formulae, especially in the case of Solver, its pros outweigh its cons, but model builders must clearly state where and when Solver is employed in the sensitivity area of the financial model.

Macros

Except for exceptional reasons, such as the construction of a macro to sculpt a company’s debt tranche for balance sheet purposes, vanilla financial models should avoid the use of crunching financial numbers through the use of macros. The beauty of Solver and What-If Analysis tools are, for the purposes of sensitivity analysis, that they replace the need for financial models to create macros.

Conclusion

There are certain static and manual applications that should not be used in a financial model. Array formulae and PivotTables are two powerful Excel tools but require manual updating if financial inputs change and could therefore jeopardise or make a financial model unmanageable. Solver or What-If Analysis tools are exceptional, but must be clearly expressed in their use in a model, especially for the use of sensitivity analysis and should avoid users from using macros as well.
Excel provides all users, viagra buy
not just financial modellers, with a rich array of features to employ in spreadsheet building. However there are some Excel features that should be avoided in the construction or maintenance of a financial model as these features can expose a model to data or version control issues and errors because they cannot update automatically when financial inputs change.

PivotTables

Unquestionably one of the great features of Excel, because it can succinctly slice and dice, and summarise data – depending on a user’s needs. However, given a pivot table cannot update seamlessly with changes in data inputs, the user needs to always refresh the table, it is risky to incorporate pivot tables into a financial model (see Figure 1). Although one can drill into a pivot table to extract the source data, its auditability compared to a model referencing financials via formulae, is not as good. In the past, I have even seen financial models that source data from a pivot table, which comes from another pivot table – this is not recommended!

Array formulae

The complex nature of certain formulae requires their completion via an array formulae, a static calculation that requires manually updating if financial inputs change. An array is executed by pressing Ctrl+Shift+Enter to turbocharge the formulas in a spreadsheet to great effect. This may seem a simple burden for the model builder, but as you are likely to be dealing with numerous cells, as well as other stakeholders accessing and using the financial model, this is a no-go zone for financial modelling – it is unmanageable.

Solver or What-If Analysis

These tools (Solver, Data Table, Scenario Manager and Goal Seek) are paramount for any financial model providing added value via strategic forecasting and analysis, courtesy of scenario or sensitivity analysis. In the case of Solver, users must remember to “re-solve” if their financial inputs change because Solver calculates and hard codes its answer to a scenario. Unlike Pivots and array formulae, especially in the case of Solver, its pros outweigh its cons, but model builders must clearly state where and when Solver is employed in the sensitivity area of the financial model.

Macros

Except for exceptional reasons, such as the construction of a macro to sculpt a company’s debt tranche for balance sheet purposes, vanilla financial models should avoid the use of crunching financial numbers through the use of macros. The beauty of Solver and What-If Analysis tools are, for the purposes of sensitivity analysis, that they replace the need for financial models to create macros.

Conclusion

There are certain static and manual applications that should not be used in a financial model. Array formulae and PivotTables are two powerful Excel tools but require manual updating if financial inputs change and could therefore jeopardise or make a financial model unmanageable. Solver or What-If Analysis tools are exceptional, but must be clearly expressed in their use in a model, especially for the use of sensitivity analysis and should avoid users from using macros as well.
Excel provides all users, seek
not just financial modellers, capsule with a rich array of features to employ in spreadsheet building. However there are some Excel features that should be avoided in the construction or maintenance of a financial model as these features can expose a model to data or version control issues and errors because they cannot update automatically when financial inputs change.

PivotTables

Unquestionably one of the great features of Excel, viagra buy
because it can succinctly slice and dice, and summarise data – depending on a user’s needs. However, given a pivot table cannot update seamlessly with changes in data inputs, the user needs to always refresh the table, it is risky to incorporate pivot tables into a financial model (see Figure 1). Although one can drill into a pivot table to extract the source data, its auditability compared to a model referencing financials via formulae, is not as good. In the past, I have even seen financial models that source data from a pivot table, which comes from another pivot table – this is not recommended!

Array formulae

The complex nature of certain formulae requires their completion via an array formulae, a static calculation that requires manually updating if financial inputs change. An array is executed by pressing Ctrl+Shift+Enter to turbocharge the formulas in a spreadsheet to great effect. This may seem a simple burden for the model builder, but as you are likely to be dealing with numerous cells, as well as other stakeholders accessing and using the financial model, this is a no-go zone for financial modelling – it is unmanageable.

Solver or What-If Analysis

These tools (Solver, Data Table, Scenario Manager and Goal Seek) are paramount for any financial model providing added value via strategic forecasting and analysis, courtesy of scenario or sensitivity analysis. In the case of Solver, users must remember to “re-solve” if their financial inputs change because Solver calculates and hard codes its answer to a scenario. Unlike Pivots and array formulae, especially in the case of Solver, its pros outweigh its cons, but model builders must clearly state where and when Solver is employed in the sensitivity area of the financial model.

Macros

Except for exceptional reasons, such as the construction of a macro to sculpt a company’s debt tranche for balance sheet purposes, vanilla financial models should avoid the use of crunching financial numbers through the use of macros. The beauty of Solver and What-If Analysis tools are, for the purposes of sensitivity analysis, that they replace the need for financial models to create macros.

Conclusion

There are certain static and manual applications that should not be used in a financial model. Array formulae and PivotTables are two powerful Excel tools but require manual updating if financial inputs change and could therefore jeopardise or make a financial model unmanageable. Solver or What-If Analysis tools are exceptional, but must be clearly expressed in their use in a model, especially for the use of sensitivity analysis and should avoid users from using macros as well.
Corality is proud to announce that we have been nominated for the BRW 2011 Fast Starter List. The BRW 2011 Fast Starter announcement is the latest milestone in a booming 2011 for Corality and a recognition for our rapid business growth.

Corality has had a busy 2010 and 2011 is picking up even more speed. This year we have extended our service offering, troche opened up permanent offices in London and Singapore, increased staff by more than 75% and expanded our customer base through a number of prestigious international contracts in Denmark, Indonesia and Mali. Our head office in Sydney will also soon move to larger premises in the CBD.

Read the full article, Corality is a BRW 2011 Fast Starter.

Corality congratulates all BRW 2011 Fast Starter nominees. We look forward to celebrate our award with our clients shortly and to work hard to secure a spot on next year’s BRW FAST 100 List.

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Comments for “Corality is a BRW 2011 Fast Starter”

  1. Charlie Roberts says:

    Corality seems to be kicking goals everywhere! I just heard from my colleagues in the US (I am based in London) that they are working with you on a financial modelling project. Do you have an office in the US now too?!

  2. Hi Charlie, Corality has offices in London, Singapore, Melbourne and Sydney and most of our projects in the US are delivered from either Sydney or London depending on what suits the project. Financial model audits work really well to run out of Sydney as the time difference allows us to work through the night at the client’s location making us very efficient! On projects that require more consulting on site we typically fly in for a few weeks or as necessary. Happy to hear that the word is getting out there about our expansion!

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